SWAT Team Used For City Ordinance Violations

A few weeks ago, Arlington, Texas local law enforcement cited a small organic farm for code violations such as, "grass that was too tall, bushes growing too close to the street, a couch and piano in the yard, chopped wood that was not properly stacked, a piece of siding that was missing from the side of the house, and generally unclean premises." Well, if the government must really get involved, I guess they could cite them and move on. Instead, the farm was raided by a large SWAT team carrying machine guns! Additionally, there was air surveillance, a 10 hour search, and the occupants were held at gun point.

The SWAT team was acting n a warrant to seize marijuana. Yet, no marijuana was even found. Thankfully, the law SWAT team saved us from much danger because they were ale to seize "17 blackberry bushes, 15 okra plants, 14 tomatillo plants ... native grasses and sunflowers." Wow! What a close call and great use of police power. Also, the police didn't even produce the warrant until two hours after the SWAT team raided the land. It will be an interesting issue for a defense lawyer.

I get it. There are times when we need SWAT to enforce the law. But really?!? An organic farm? This is just one of numerous examples when police departments overuse SWAT teams and paramilitary to enforce less serious crime. Just recently, a similar thing happened when St. Louis County, Missouri used SWAT to serve an administrative warrant. What’s next? When you get a speeding ticket, they’ll pull you over with a tank! If it’s a DUI investigation, they’ll call in the stealth bombers! I wonder how the criminal defense attorney would handle that motion to dismiss?

We support our law enforcement, but come one, try to be half way reasonable. Reserve our tax dollars and opportunities to invade Constitutional rights for more serious legal issues.

Categories: Constitution, Criminal law
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